AHK: Visualizing ELSE/IF with Arrays

So Hopper’s Amazing Decipherer Script 1.0 was about 472 lines because it included ELSE IF clauses for every letter in the alphabet.

HADS 2.0 cuts it down to 77 lines because arrays, as it turns out, are incredibly useful when paired with loops.

Making a Rotated Alphabet

Deciphering a Caesar cipher requires that the alphabet be moved up by a certain number. Like so.

ROTchart

Notice that this is basically a 2-step process. Turn the letters of the alphabet into numbers 1-26. Then add the rotational value to each of them to find their new positions, in the code below that’s assigned to a variable called indexVar. In ROT1, A =1 and the rotational value is 1, so A = 1+1 = 2.

But what happens when you hit Z? Z=26 and the rotation is 1, so Z =  26+1 = 27.

So, you want to tell the computer IF the number goes above 27, then you want to reset it to 1 and continue.

A Slow Motion Loop

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AHK: What is an Array?

Arrays are a damn godsend. More specifically, they’re an easy way to deal with large lists. Why is this useful you ask? Imagine you want to run the same code on multiple items. The items could be numbers, letters, words, full sentences—anything.  By putting those things in a list, or an array, you can loop through hundreds, even thousands, of items with just a few lines of code.

ArrayGif1

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AHK: How to Decipher the Caesar Shift with Code

VG JNF N OEVTUG PBYQ QNL VA NCEVY NAQ GUR PYBPXF JRER FGEVXVAT GUVEGRRA JVAFGBA FZVGU UVF PUVA AHMMYRQ VAGB UVF OERNFG VA NA  RSSBEG GB RFPNCR GUR IVYR JVAQ FYVCCRQ DHVPXYL GUEBHTU GUR TYNFF QBBEF BS IVPGBEL ZNAFVBAF GUBHTU ABG DHVPXYL RABHTU GB CERIRAG N FJVEY BS TEVGGL QHFG SEBZ RAGREVAT NYBAT JVGU UVZ

-No idea what this says. Damn you, Caesar.

The Caesar Shift is supposed to be ridiculously easy to decipher. I say supposed to be because while it might be easy to crack, translating the bastard is mind-numbingly painful if you have a substantial block of text.

There are quite a few resources online that’ll do it for you, but for kicks, I wrote an AHK that automates it—if you know how many positions you want to shift.

So How Does the Shift Work?

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AHK: How to Loop Code through Images

Need to make changes to every pixel in an image? As it turns out, that’s not so difficult with AutoHotkey. From what I’ve been able to gather, all you really need is the height and width of the picture so that the loop knows how many times to run and the XY coordinates of the picture’s upper left corner.

The Code

Note that CoordMode, Pixel, Screen tells the computer to use the XY coordinates relative to the screen rather than the window.

CoordMode, Pixel, Screen

Height:=Height of the Image
Width:=Width of the Image
Xaxis:=X-Coordinate to start at
Yaxis:=Y-Coordinate to start at

loop, %Height%
{
loop, %Width%
{

Do This Code, Xaxis, Yaxis

Xaxis++

}
Xaxis:= Xaxis-Width
Yaxis++
}

How the Loops Work

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AHK: How BGR Color Works

Sadly, in AutoHotkey scripts  you can’t just demand “LIME” or “GENTLY BURNT ORANGE”. The computer will spit out an error message if you try. It requires a color ID in hexadecimal BGR (Blue, Green, Red) format.

If you’re wondering what the hell that is, you’re not alone.

The simple answer? It’s an 8 digit code assigned to each color. Look them up on Google if you want to preserve your mental health.

Keep reading if you’re less partial to your sanity.

The Complicated Answer

I just relearned how to count, damn it. That’s how complicated this is.

Hex Explained

You see, Color ID’s are made up of a fixed prefix and numbers that represent a combination of blue, green and red.

The amount of those colors can be anywhere between 0 and 255. Here starts the problem of counting. How do you tell the computer to use the max green value (255) if you can only use a 2 digit number?

You use a different counting system by adding letters A-F. That’s how.

BASE10LOWRES

It’s Base-16 because you’re counting by combining 16 characters: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, a, b, c, d, e, f.

If you’re only manipulating one color while the others are at 0, all you really need to know is that lower values are darker than higher ones.

16-BASE EXPLAINED

When you start combining colors, the same normal color rules apply. To make yellow, you jack up the red and green values, so the BGR will read 0x00ffff. Blue and red makes purple, so 0xff00ff.

The oddest thing to get used to is white being the max value of blue, green and red combined, 0xffffff. Just remember that the higher the value, the more they cancel each other out until they reach nothing. White.

AHK: How to Lose Friends & Alienate People with Code

Automating keystrokes is a fun way to spend an afternoon. It’s also an entertaining to wrap your head around the idea of loops and variables. If you’re wanting extra practice, give these a try.

Note: You’ll need AutoHotkey installed for this. If you don’t know what that is, click here.

Important Commands to Note:

run, Name of Program.exe
SendInput Keystrokes to Send
Sleep, Delay in Milliseconds

Loop, # of times to run loop
{
Commands to run
}

All Work and No Play

Take a look at this code.

run, notepad.exe
Loop, 100
{
SendInput All Work And No Play Makes Jack A Dull Boy.
}
return

Keep in mind that everything inside the loop will happen 100 times, so with just 6 lines of code, you can make the computer type this sentence over and over again. In action, it kind of makes your computer seem possessed.

Dull Boy

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AHK Update: Targeted File Deleter Program

Welcome to the combo post of How to Delete Every Other File in a Folder and How to Make a GUI. For lack of a better name, I’m calling it a targeted file deleter program. It can automate the process of deleting every other file if the file name ends in sequential numbers.

For those who couldn’t care less about how it functions, just follow these two steps.

STEP 1: Fire up a new AutoHotkey* file.
*Download it here if you haven’t already.

STEP 2: Paste this text inside. And run the file.

Gui, -Caption
Gui, Color, Black
Gui, Font, cWhite s12
Gui, Add, Text, , The Targeted File Deleter
Gui, Add, Text, , Note: File names must be sequential (for ex. IMG_1.jpg) and cannot have leading zeros (IMG_001.jpg).
Gui, Add, Text, , What is the folder you want to delete files from? (Ex. C:\Users\Desktop\)
Gui, Add, Edit, vFilePath w500 cblack
Gui, Add, Text, , How does the file name start? (Do not include numbers)
Gui, Add, Edit, vFileNameStart w500 cblack
Gui, Add, Text, , What number does the file name start at?
Gui, Add, Edit, vFileNumberStart w500 cblack
Gui, Add, Text, , By what increment do you want to delete files?
Gui, Add, Edit, vIncrement w500 cblack
Gui, Add, Text, , What is the file extension? (Ex. .jpg, .pdf, .doc)
Gui, Add, Edit, vExtension w500 cblack
Gui, Add, Text, , How many files have you got total?
Gui, Add, Edit, vLoopCount w500 cblack
Gui, Add, Button, x570 y370, OK
Gui, Add, Button, x570 y410, Cancel
Gui, Show, , The Mass File Deleter
return

ButtonOK:
Gui, Submit
Loop
{
if A_Index < %LoopCount%
FileDelete, %FilePath%%FileNameStart%%FileNumberStart%%Extension%
FileNumberStart+=%Increment%
}
return

ButtonCancel:
ExitApp

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